Herein lies Madness

Jul. 28th, 2017 11:09 am
tanuki_green: (Ren Jishi)
[personal profile] tanuki_green
It's been a crazy couple of weeks.  Alice has had a couple of Chemo treatments, and so far, things are improving.  She's catting much better than she was.  She's still got a ways to go, but the light seems to be back in her eyes and she's getting more demanding again, too.  

I've had some more dental work done (3 more fillings in my face which now brings me to a total of 6 as of now) and I have to go back in next month for even more, but that should be the last of it for a while. *crosses fingers*

My brain squirrels have been mostly quiet, but there's still some pangs of anxiety about some issues that are totally my issues and not anyone else's, but they are anxieties about others.  I keep reminding myself that these things are MY issues so I am aware of them and try not to let the anxieties bleed over onto others.  They don't deserve that crazy on them.  Mostly, all of my anxiety issues are around my perceived worth to the people around me that I have relationships with (friends, etc.).  

Surf on the Washington coast was only good on the days I COULD have gone on a day where I HAD to be at home to help with Alice, so I haven't gotten out to surf in quite a while.  I keep hoping another good weekend day will come up, but it's definitely not happening this weekend.

Sorry this post is all over the place.  I seem to have a lot on my mind...


Bullet Journals

Jul. 28th, 2017 01:53 pm
fellinara: (Jedi Order)
[personal profile] fellinara posting in [community profile] bujo
Hi Everyone! I'm pretty new to bullet journalling and am looking at getting a Leuchttrum 1917 journal. Amazon has them on Prime for just shy of $20. I'm currently using a small temp bullet journal for August to get an idea on what spreads and collections will work for me and which ones are not really. I see that these journals/notebooks (also Moleskine and a few other brands)use a system of type of journal(??) such as A5, A6, etc. New to the bullet journal movement, I am not entirely sure what that means. I figured if anyone knows, it will be here.

Thanks!
ceciliatan: (default)
[personal profile] ceciliatan


I’m at the RWA national conference in Orlando right now, where there’s always something more to think about, learn, or analyze about writing or romance publishing. In particular one writing craft panel I wanted to highlight was yesterday I attended a great panel workshop given by four New York Times bestselling authors: Lexi Blake, Cynthia Eden, Laura Kaye, and Rebecca Zanetti. The topic was on creating a large cast of characters to carry a series and the room was packed.

The discussion ranged over various details from the nuts and bolts of creating a series “bible” to keep all the details right from book to book (character eye color, favorite catch phrases, back stories, each character’s hidden secret or flaw, etc) to developing secondary characters into primary ones when “their turn for a book” comes.

I didn’t transcribe the entire panel since I was trying to focus on absorbing things relevant to me, but two questions in particular I got down almost every word, and I’m posting to share it with everyone.

Laura Kaye acted as moderator, asking the leading questions for the panel and then finishing off giving her own answer.

First she asked the panelists to describe the pros and cons of working with large casts.

Cynthia Eden: We’ve all heard the expression that no man or woman is an island? Characters don’t exist in isolation. You’re never just writing about one individual. You are by circumstance always writing about a cast of characters. You give them an instant background with their family and friends. With my romantic suspense novels I like to use teams. I write FBI teams. You’re going to need a lead investigator, a profiler, an ME, etc. You’re going to need all these people. So that’s a major pro. And any cast leads to sequels. That’s the biggest pro because it has your reader eager to go on to the next book.

Lexi Blake: Pro of a large cast? It’s fun! I like to write a lot of dialogue and you get a lot of dialogue when you have a big ol’ cast of characters. The con is… I guess there isn’t one. Well, maybe it’s that you have to make each character unique. That can be a challenge. (But that’s fun, too.)

Rebecca Zanetti: A large cast is great to show characterization. You act differently with different people. I have one sister I tease like crazy and one that I can’t. You can show different facets of a character and that’s one I like a lot. Also the slow burn character, I love. That person who shows up in book one and they build up for a long time before they get their story. You can develop them over a series. The con is you sometimes get too many people on a page. Even if you’re on book 4 or 5 of a series, you hope new readers are picking them up. You don’t want to confuse that new reader with too many new characters all at once.

Lexi: Well, and as you write the books they get longer because you keep having to put everyone’s favorite characters in there. Then you have to do the backyard BBQ scene to get them all in!

Laura Kaye: I agree, on the backyard BBQ. The thing that is great about having all these characters is you have the built in relationships where it’s easy to have humor, and it’s easy to have stakes because there are many people who could be hurt or feel lied-to or betrayed. Lots of emotional hooks for your readers. Not just for your sequels where they buy into a beloved secondary character, but for the tertiary characters who can manage to hook interest and get pulled into the story. You can expand a series if it takes off and starts doing well. It gives you the flexibility to do spin-offs. The cons are that your POV characters can’t just absorb a tennis match of other people talking. They have to be engaged in the conversation. Then there’s the giant pronoun problem when you have, say, five military guys on your team planning a mission and you have to figure out the mechanics of writing that dialogue so it’s not monotonous to the reader. The other con is if you’re going with a traditional publisher and you have 5 main characters, but your publisher stops after three books. You can end up with disappointed readers on your hands.

What are some tips for developing such a large number of characters? What are some tips for distinguishing them?

Rebecca: One thing I like is nicknames, if he calls her honey or sweetcheeks makes a difference. Also their motivations. If you play a joke on one friend, they laugh, another one never forgives you. They’re different. There are the little tidbits you put in. I have one guy that likes grape energy drinks and if I don’t put that in readers will write and say does he not like those anymore? Also their wounds. What hurt this guy, what is he still afraid of?

Lexi: if you don’t know those characters, the reader won’t know them. I think you don’t have to know everything before you start, but you have to know what makes them laugh, what makes them cry. I’ve written a lot of small town romance. And getting to know the neighbors and walking through the town can pull you in. But even an office building can have a sense of place. Put your characters around a table and see who talks first. If you’re just putting traits in a notebook and there’s no real emotion behind them it’s going to show. I love using dialogue. Some speak, fast, some slow, and you need to be able to hear them in your head.

Cynthia: I like to work with opposites on a team. You’ll have one guy who’s the hothead and always jumps right in. Then I have a team member who likes to sit back and get all the info before jumping in. So she and the first guy are going to have a clash. My action-first character, if he’s angry, he’s not just going to sit still. He’ll be pacing and clenching his fists and all that. All this body language that this character is doing with reveal his personality. The one who is the analytical sort? She’s not going to just kick in a door. She’ll be trying to talk the person down. Those personality styles lead me into what they should do in each scene. You don’t want them doing something that isn’t their normal nature without a really, really good explanation. Be aware, though, I’ve had New York editors tell me that the way I talk isn’t real, people don’t say that. I’m Southern. Something that seems so normal to me was something they didn’t like. But I think bringing in realistic dialect is a great way to distinguish the characters.

Laura: Think of it as a shorthand for your character. I learned a lot about creating unique characters from reading JR Ward’s Black Dagger Brotherhood series. One is the blind king who wears the weird sunglasses. And one is the sarcastic one with the dragon tattoo who sucks on lollipops all the time. Then there’s the black-eyed, scarred one who is soulless and never speaks. I don’t even have to use their names: they’re immediately distinct. And when all twelve are in a room having a briefing session, you don’t have to use their names, because you know when so quickly from their distinguishing characteristics who’s who. Also, what are things that make the reader see them as endearing or real, that make the reader fall in love with that person? That grape energy drink or they’re a dog-lover or whatever. The more you can create those personal things the better, beyond scars and tattoos, beyond eye color and hair color. I have a lot of guys who swear but they can’t all say “Aw, hell.” Only one of them can say that and the other guys have to say something else.

As usual, the conference has been fantastic. If you are writing romance, or any kind of commercial fiction, I highly recommend attending one of these if you can afford it. In romance, I really feel I can’t afford *NOT* to be here!

Mirrored from blog.ceciliatan.com.

(no subject)

Jul. 28th, 2017 09:04 am
aldersprig: (LynConstruction)
[personal profile] aldersprig



“Fore!… Damnit! I don’t know what’s up with me today, Jim, I just can’t swing a damn stick!”

Open to all Patreons!




Originally posted Aug. 10, 2011

🛒

I think it's fair that I thought Farnah was male.

Read On!




This week on What an Old House, we’re doing some exploratory demolition in our 1860’s farmhouse’s bathroom.

🏠

Now this bathroom has some interesting features right from the get-go. You can see from the photos that the entire bathroom was covered in these 50’s-era Masonite panels.

Take a Peek!

Senate ACA Repeal bill fails (again)

Jul. 27th, 2017 11:30 pm
teaotter: (Default)
[personal profile] teaotter posting in [community profile] thisfinecrew
In a dramatic late-night vote, three Republican senators join all 48 Democrats in voting down the so-called "skinny" repeal bill. (Politico)

I was following twitter feeds of some of the reporters at the Senate during the vote-a-rama, and everyone was pretty much stunned by the turn of events. For more than an hour, Republicans refused to close the previous vote so that they'd have more time to strong-arm McCain, Murkowski, and Collins. No one knew what was being said, so reporters were describing body language and hoping. I couldn't believe it was going to go our way, even when Pence left the building.

And then the votes came in.

WE WON!

(Okay, nothing's officially dead until we get a better ACA repair bill in play, but still -- this was supposed to be a done deal in January and we've fought it to a fucking standstill and I AM SO PROUD OF US, LOOK HOW STRONG WE ARE TOGETHER!)

(no subject)

Jul. 28th, 2017 01:55 am
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
[personal profile] alexseanchai
One of KM Weiland's pieces of advice in Outlining Your Novel (though this is actually in chapter "Before You Begin Your Outline") is:

"If you could have a professional reviewer read your idealized concept of your finished book and totally get it—completely understand everything you're trying to say with your characters, plot, dialogue, and themes—what would he write about your story?"

And then you, being specific, thorough, and extravagant, are that reviewer.

OKAY THAT SOUNDS LIKE FUN wait how do I do that
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Thanks to an audience poll, this is the free epic for the July 4, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl. It's spillover from the June 6, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] siliconshaman. It also fills the "public places" square in my 5-29-17 card for the Pride Bingo fest. This poem belongs to the series Polychrome Heroics.

WARNING: This poem contains intense and controversial topics. Highlight to read the warnings, some of which are spoilers. namasteIt includes hate groups, racism, hateful language, attempted invasion of a racist protest into a peaceful neighborhood, arguments over free speech vs. the right to be free of verbal abuse, a lion, and other challenges. If these are sensitive issues for you, please consider your tastes and headspace before moving onward.

Read more... )

Nerd Sex Joke

Jul. 27th, 2017 10:06 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today I found the funniest nerd sex joke I have ever encountered. It was written on a throw pillow: "Na-ma-ste ... in bed." At first glance, it looks like a simple pun on "-ste" and "stay." However, the ending puts it into the category of "... in bed" jokes. What made it so funny that I cracked up when I heard someone reading it aloud is: namaste is Sanskrit for "the god in me sees the god in you." ... in bed. ROTFLMAO!

Moment of Silence: June Foray

Jul. 27th, 2017 09:46 pm
ysabetwordsmith: (moment of silence)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
 June Foray has passed away.  She played Rocky the Squirrel and hundreds of other characters.

I guess she wanted to celebrate her 100th birthday at GreatCon.  Because who wouldn't?

Writing against type

Jul. 27th, 2017 08:18 pm
maeve_of_winter: (Default)
[personal profile] maeve_of_winter
I'm writing a fic right now that's somewhat challenging in its characterization, and it got me thinking: how do you tackle characters dealing with emotions or reacting to situations they've never come close to encountering in canon? Or them consciously choosing to change who they are as a person?

For me, my fic is a Riverdale/Archie Comics fic for the FP Jones/Kevin Keller pairing called "Second Time Around." It has FP Jones, a rough and tough gang leader in canon, now trying to step up in his role as a newly single parent, as well as trying act more like a gentleman in order to convince Kevin Keller to stay with him. It can get difficult, because the situation in itself requires FP to change from how he is in canon into someone who's more gentle and caring, so it can very easily stretch the willing suspension of disbelief.

And now I'm curious! How do you, as a writer, believably keep a character as themselves while writing about them acting differently than how they are in canon, or willingly choosing to act unlike themselves?


gingicat: the hands of Doctor Who #10, Martha Jones, and Jack Harkness clasped together with the caption "All for One" (all for one)
[personal profile] gingicat posting in [community profile] metaquotes
The characters I liked best? The bad guys. They were hard-working citizens who got screwed out of jobs that were legally contracted as theirs. So they decided to do something else, by selling alien equipment.

Context contains spoilers for a movie currently in theatres.

Spiderman

Jul. 27th, 2017 07:10 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
We went to see Spiderman today. It was a painful-to-watch paean to the misery of modern adolescence, Tony Stark's A+ parenting, and the infinite breadth of human stupidity. >_< The characters I liked best? The bad guys. They were hard-working citizens who got screwed out of jobs that were legally contracted as theirs. So they decided to do something else, by selling alien equipment. See, this is what happens when you fuck people over. It makes me want to go write Beach Hero, but I've got other stuff I'm trying to finish.

Loose-leaf Links #44

Jul. 28th, 2017 08:00 am
calissa: A black and white photo of a large, dark teapot and a small Chinese teacup with a fish painted on the side (Tea)
[personal profile] calissa

Iron Goddess, Guan Yin, Guanyin, Quan Yin, Kwan Yin, loose-leaf tea, Adore Tea, Loose-leaf Links, Earl Grey Editing

Loose-leaf Links is a feature where I gather together the interesting bits and pieces on sci-fi, fantasy and romance I’ve come across and share them with you over tea. Today’s tea is Iron Goddess Tie Guan Yin from Adore Tea. Being an oolong, it’s a little heavier than green tea, though this one retains a bit of the grassy flavour of sencha.

Awards News ) Community and Conventions ) On Equity ) For Writers ) For Readers )

Mirrored from Earl Grey Editing.

"Superman", Rachel Platten

Jul. 27th, 2017 04:19 pm
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
[personal profile] alexseanchai
So put your armor on the ground tonight
'Cause everyone's got to come down sometime

You don't have to be Superman
You don't have to be Superman
You don't have to hold the world in your hands
You've already shown me that you can
Don't have to be Superman
aldersprig: (luke)
[personal profile] aldersprig
Interlude: Luke
by Lyn Thorne-Alder


Monday, December 11, 2000

He thought he might hit something.

He was certain he was going to hit something.  The question was whether or not he was going to manage to wait until he was out of Regine’s office.

“I know.”  He spoke very carefully, because if you got “emotional” around Regine, she stopped listening.  “Emotional” meant that you weren’t being “rational,” and that meant that she could discount any and everything you said.  “I’m aware that the Student Council interfered in the matter of Zita.  But they don’t see the same things as we do, and they’re — they’re biased.”

read on...
aldersprig: (Side Quest)
[personal profile] aldersprig
Twelve: Watch What You Say

The man who might or might not b the Diamond Raven struggled, but he couldn’t seem to do anything about the cord around his neck and, rather than have Raizel tug it tighter, he followed her.  “I have things I should get-” he protested, but she didn’t listen, and then “I shouldn’t leave a candle burning-” and then “someone needs to watch the sacred spot.”

“Someone does,” she agrees.  “But having it be you might be a bit silly.”

“And why would it be silly for it to be me?”  He raised his eyebrows at her in challenge.

read on…

Profile

clare_dragonfly: woman with green feathery wings, text: stories last longer: but only by becoming only stories (Default)
Clare-Dragonfly

July 2017

S M T W T F S
       1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 28th, 2017 06:49 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios